Spike a smart laser measurement solution for your phone or tablet

Spike a smart laser measurement solution for your phone or tablet

Code: 940-02301    Brand: ike GPS   
Spike is a smart laser measurement solution for all types of geospatial pplications.
APN: 856318006001
Supplier Code: 940-02301

Photo Measure: real-time measurements from a photo

Spike’s photo measurement capability allows you to measure hard-to-reach objects that would have otherwise required additional equipment, labor or tools. All it takes is one person to capture all the measurements you need, and while at a safe location and distance.

Measure Remote Objects and Collect GPS/GNSS Location From A Distance

Data collected with Spike can be exported as a KMZ file or imported into GIS software, including Collector for ArcGIS and Survey123 for ArcGIS.Measure and Share Using the Spike Cloud

Point-to-Point: measure the distance between two objects

Simply aim Spike at the first object, such as the side of a house, and take a photo. Then, aim at your second object, such as a tree, and take a photo. Spike then calculates the distance between those two objects. In addition to the distance measurement, Spike also calculates the linear distance for vertical and horizontal measurements.

Export and share captured photos and measurements

Spike also supports design, architecture, engineering, construction, and GIS software, including Collector for ArcGIS, Survey123 for ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Revit, ARCHICAD, Adobe Illustrator, CorelDraw, and Flexi.

Measure and Share Using the Spike Cloud

The Spike Cloud offers premium features, such as export options for compatibility with third-party design and CAD packages, adding notes to images, and advanced folder organization.

Once positioned at a sign, a field inspector would take out an iPad with a Spike attached, and take a photo of the sign. In fact, the department’s record during the project was 150 photos of signs captured in one day with Spike. When back at the office the next day, an inspector, or Vaughn, would then take area and height measurements of the sign using the Spike mobile app, export a Spike XML file with photos to OneDrive, run the GIS script, and lastly import the photo with the measurement and location data into ArcGIS Online

The attribute data for each sign captured with Spike, including dimensions and location, is uploaded into ArcGIS Online.

Spike is a smart laser measurement solution for all types of geospatial applications. With Spike, you can quickly measure the width, height and area of objects, such as buildings or other assets, simply by taking a photo from your smartphone or tablet.

Spike allows you to measure an object simply by taking a photo with your smartphone or tablet. From that photo you can capture real-time measurements, including height, width, area, and the distance between two points. Today, thousands of contractors rely on Spike every day to get their field work done more quickly, efficiently and safely.

Integrating Survey123 with Spike (Estimate Locations)

While the heart of what Spike excels at is helping you measuring dimensions over photos, you can also use Survey123 to roughly estimate the location of remote objects.  For example, you can map the location of a building without stepping out of your car, or the location of a streetlight across the street.

Before we go into the details of estimating the location of remote objects, I want to emphasize that Spike is not a high accuracy surveying device.  It can measure accurately distances to objects, but when estimating the location of remote objects there are several sources of error that will come into play outside of what Spike is designed to do.

The location of your own phone or tablet: This is the first source of error. A typical smartphone is not going to give you a highly accurate location for your phone. Your location accuracy may vary depending on many factors and if your location is off, the estimated location of the remote object will be off too.  To correct this problem, you can connect an external GNSS receiver to your own phone or tablet via Bluetooth. If used correctly, external GNSS receivers will improve the source location used by Spike in its calculations.

The distance to the remote object: This is going to be very accurate as long as you keep yourself within the working range of Spike (2 to 200 meters) and you aim at the remote object using the bull’s eye in the Spike app. Measuring distances to objects is what Spike is designed to do, and does it very well.

The azimuth to the remote object as measured from your own device location: The azimuth is another important source of error. The azimuth is obtained from the compass in your own smartphone or tablet. The compass in your smartphone must be calibrated before use by Spike. 

Ideal target range: The ideal working range of the laser is between 6 and 100 meters, although technically you can push the limits and measure objects between 2 and 200 meters away.

Center your target: You also want to make sure that the object you want to measure is right in the center of the camera bulls eye, because the laser always calculates distances through the bulls eye.

Draw accurately: Once you have taken the photo, you will want to make sure you accurately draw your lines and areas for measurement. The Spike app has a handy magnifying window that will help you with that task.   If your photo is taken following all the tips above, but you do not take pride in carefully drawing the exact shapes you want to measure… the measurement will not be as accurate as it could be.

Spike Stories: City of Winston-Salem Zoning Team Cuts Costs on Sign Inventory & Compliance

In the United States, local governments are responsible for surveying their ground signs for compliance on a regular basis and keeping a detailed record of the history of the sign. This is no small task for a city to accomplish, and is typically time and cost-consuming. The Zoning Department with the City of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, was getting ready to start their signage inventory project, due to a new sign ordinance, when they discovered Spike.

Jeff Vaughn, the Zoning Inspection Supervisor with the City of Winston-Salem, says that they were initially going to hire land surveyors to complete the project, but ultimately decided to use Spike and their own staff for this assignment after speaking with a local sign company that was successfully using Spike. That sign company lent Vaughn their Spike for testing, and after quickly seeing how easy it was to measure the height and square footage of a sign, the city ordered their own Spike units. They initially started with one Spike and then quickly ordered more as they developed their workflows.

Equipped with Spike units and iPads, Vaughn’s team was able to collect, review, and verify compliance on 3,000 signs in less than three months. They developed a process with a team of six in-house employees across departments, which involved going to every ground sign not attached to a building in the city.

As part of that survey process for this project, Christopher Sparks, I.S. Project Coordinator with the City of Winston-Salem, and Vaughn’s team worked with their GIS department. According to Sparks, “the GIS team wrote a script that took the Spike files and imported them into Esri’s ArcGIS so we could capture all attribute data.” With a Spike photo, Vaughn’s team was not only able to capture measurement data, but also the GPS location of a sign.

"The amount of time saved was greater for us because we didn’t have to hire land surveyors to go out and do the work. We also had tremendous cost savings by using Spike and using employees rather than an outside vendor, which could have cost $200,000-500,000 to inventory every sign in the city,” explains Vaughn. In fact, Vaughn and Sparks estimate that their hardware costs for this inventory project was less than $5,000.

According to Sparks, “from an IT perspective the project was a success. Spike and ArcGIS let Vaughn and his team accomplish what they needed to do. We now have a comprehensive sign inventory. Since the signs mostly belong to commercial properties, and they are not required to be in compliance until 2022, we can change a flag on the back end in ArcGIS, redo the intersect, update property owners, and notify the new owners. We have something in place that will last for a while.”

Vaughn and Sparks recommend Spike and ArcGIS to other cities and zoning departments. Vaughn believes that this solution “certainly helped us from an enforcement perspective, because we have an accurate count of the signs in the city and also an inventory for them. We can always see a photo of the sign and the history. We have several people who have changed signs without a sign permit, so Spike and ArcGIS have been helpful when we have to go back and enforce measurement. We can show what the sign looked like on one date and then prove how the sign was different on a later date.”

The zoning team is now using Spike on other projects. For example, they take Spike photos for all new ground signs, and then incorporate the photo and measurement and location data into ArcGIS to catalog the sign’s record. In this way, they always have a current inventory of all the signs in the city. They also plan to use Spike for measuring light poles and building heights to check compliance on height restrictions.

 

Device and OS

Apple iOS & Google Android smartphones and tablets.

Battery

Internal Li-ion Battery

Connectivity

BLUETOOTH 4.0 low energy technology

Range

6 – 650 Feet (2 - 200 Meters)

Accuracy

Distance: ± 5cm (2 in)
Photo Measure: ± 1%

Units

Feet, Inches, Meters, Centimeters

Output Formats

PDF, JPG, Spike File (XML), KMZ, URL

CASE STUDIES
Columbine Window Tint - Case Study
Spike Stories City of Winston Salem - Case Study
BROCHURES
Spike a smart laser measurement solution for your phone or tablet - Brochure
DATASHEETS
Spike a smart laser measurement solution for your phone or tablet - Datasheet

OVERVIEW

Photo Measure: real-time measurements from a photo

Spike’s photo measurement capability allows you to measure hard-to-reach objects that would have otherwise required additional equipment, labor or tools. All it takes is one person to capture all the measurements you need, and while at a safe location and distance.

Measure Remote Objects and Collect GPS/GNSS Location From A Distance

Data collected with Spike can be exported as a KMZ file or imported into GIS software, including Collector for ArcGIS and Survey123 for ArcGIS.Measure and Share Using the Spike Cloud

Point-to-Point: measure the distance between two objects

Simply aim Spike at the first object, such as the side of a house, and take a photo. Then, aim at your second object, such as a tree, and take a photo. Spike then calculates the distance between those two objects. In addition to the distance measurement, Spike also calculates the linear distance for vertical and horizontal measurements.

Export and share captured photos and measurements

Spike also supports design, architecture, engineering, construction, and GIS software, including Collector for ArcGIS, Survey123 for ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Revit, ARCHICAD, Adobe Illustrator, CorelDraw, and Flexi.

Measure and Share Using the Spike Cloud

The Spike Cloud offers premium features, such as export options for compatibility with third-party design and CAD packages, adding notes to images, and advanced folder organization.

Once positioned at a sign, a field inspector would take out an iPad with a Spike attached, and take a photo of the sign. In fact, the department’s record during the project was 150 photos of signs captured in one day with Spike. When back at the office the next day, an inspector, or Vaughn, would then take area and height measurements of the sign using the Spike mobile app, export a Spike XML file with photos to OneDrive, run the GIS script, and lastly import the photo with the measurement and location data into ArcGIS Online

The attribute data for each sign captured with Spike, including dimensions and location, is uploaded into ArcGIS Online.

FEATURES

Spike is a smart laser measurement solution for all types of geospatial applications. With Spike, you can quickly measure the width, height and area of objects, such as buildings or other assets, simply by taking a photo from your smartphone or tablet.

Spike allows you to measure an object simply by taking a photo with your smartphone or tablet. From that photo you can capture real-time measurements, including height, width, area, and the distance between two points. Today, thousands of contractors rely on Spike every day to get their field work done more quickly, efficiently and safely.

Integrating Survey123 with Spike (Estimate Locations)

While the heart of what Spike excels at is helping you measuring dimensions over photos, you can also use Survey123 to roughly estimate the location of remote objects.  For example, you can map the location of a building without stepping out of your car, or the location of a streetlight across the street.

Before we go into the details of estimating the location of remote objects, I want to emphasize that Spike is not a high accuracy surveying device.  It can measure accurately distances to objects, but when estimating the location of remote objects there are several sources of error that will come into play outside of what Spike is designed to do.

The location of your own phone or tablet: This is the first source of error. A typical smartphone is not going to give you a highly accurate location for your phone. Your location accuracy may vary depending on many factors and if your location is off, the estimated location of the remote object will be off too.  To correct this problem, you can connect an external GNSS receiver to your own phone or tablet via Bluetooth. If used correctly, external GNSS receivers will improve the source location used by Spike in its calculations.

The distance to the remote object: This is going to be very accurate as long as you keep yourself within the working range of Spike (2 to 200 meters) and you aim at the remote object using the bull’s eye in the Spike app. Measuring distances to objects is what Spike is designed to do, and does it very well.

The azimuth to the remote object as measured from your own device location: The azimuth is another important source of error. The azimuth is obtained from the compass in your own smartphone or tablet. The compass in your smartphone must be calibrated before use by Spike. 

Ideal target range: The ideal working range of the laser is between 6 and 100 meters, although technically you can push the limits and measure objects between 2 and 200 meters away.

Center your target: You also want to make sure that the object you want to measure is right in the center of the camera bulls eye, because the laser always calculates distances through the bulls eye.

Draw accurately: Once you have taken the photo, you will want to make sure you accurately draw your lines and areas for measurement. The Spike app has a handy magnifying window that will help you with that task.   If your photo is taken following all the tips above, but you do not take pride in carefully drawing the exact shapes you want to measure… the measurement will not be as accurate as it could be.

Spike Stories: City of Winston-Salem Zoning Team Cuts Costs on Sign Inventory & Compliance

In the United States, local governments are responsible for surveying their ground signs for compliance on a regular basis and keeping a detailed record of the history of the sign. This is no small task for a city to accomplish, and is typically time and cost-consuming. The Zoning Department with the City of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, was getting ready to start their signage inventory project, due to a new sign ordinance, when they discovered Spike.

Jeff Vaughn, the Zoning Inspection Supervisor with the City of Winston-Salem, says that they were initially going to hire land surveyors to complete the project, but ultimately decided to use Spike and their own staff for this assignment after speaking with a local sign company that was successfully using Spike. That sign company lent Vaughn their Spike for testing, and after quickly seeing how easy it was to measure the height and square footage of a sign, the city ordered their own Spike units. They initially started with one Spike and then quickly ordered more as they developed their workflows.

Equipped with Spike units and iPads, Vaughn’s team was able to collect, review, and verify compliance on 3,000 signs in less than three months. They developed a process with a team of six in-house employees across departments, which involved going to every ground sign not attached to a building in the city.

As part of that survey process for this project, Christopher Sparks, I.S. Project Coordinator with the City of Winston-Salem, and Vaughn’s team worked with their GIS department. According to Sparks, “the GIS team wrote a script that took the Spike files and imported them into Esri’s ArcGIS so we could capture all attribute data.” With a Spike photo, Vaughn’s team was not only able to capture measurement data, but also the GPS location of a sign.

"The amount of time saved was greater for us because we didn’t have to hire land surveyors to go out and do the work. We also had tremendous cost savings by using Spike and using employees rather than an outside vendor, which could have cost $200,000-500,000 to inventory every sign in the city,” explains Vaughn. In fact, Vaughn and Sparks estimate that their hardware costs for this inventory project was less than $5,000.

According to Sparks, “from an IT perspective the project was a success. Spike and ArcGIS let Vaughn and his team accomplish what they needed to do. We now have a comprehensive sign inventory. Since the signs mostly belong to commercial properties, and they are not required to be in compliance until 2022, we can change a flag on the back end in ArcGIS, redo the intersect, update property owners, and notify the new owners. We have something in place that will last for a while.”

Vaughn and Sparks recommend Spike and ArcGIS to other cities and zoning departments. Vaughn believes that this solution “certainly helped us from an enforcement perspective, because we have an accurate count of the signs in the city and also an inventory for them. We can always see a photo of the sign and the history. We have several people who have changed signs without a sign permit, so Spike and ArcGIS have been helpful when we have to go back and enforce measurement. We can show what the sign looked like on one date and then prove how the sign was different on a later date.”

The zoning team is now using Spike on other projects. For example, they take Spike photos for all new ground signs, and then incorporate the photo and measurement and location data into ArcGIS to catalog the sign’s record. In this way, they always have a current inventory of all the signs in the city. They also plan to use Spike for measuring light poles and building heights to check compliance on height restrictions.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

Device and OS

Apple iOS & Google Android smartphones and tablets.

Battery

Internal Li-ion Battery

Connectivity

BLUETOOTH 4.0 low energy technology

Range

6 – 650 Feet (2 - 200 Meters)

Accuracy

Distance: ± 5cm (2 in)
Photo Measure: ± 1%

Units

Feet, Inches, Meters, Centimeters

Output Formats

PDF, JPG, Spike File (XML), KMZ, URL

DOWNLOADS

CASE STUDIES
Columbine Window Tint - Case Study
Spike Stories City of Winston Salem - Case Study
BROCHURES
Spike a smart laser measurement solution for your phone or tablet - Brochure
DATASHEETS
Spike a smart laser measurement solution for your phone or tablet - Datasheet
PROMOTIONS